Georgia Criminal Appellate Law Blog Offering Insight and Commentary on Appellate Law and Criminal Trial Practice

Category Archives: News

Subscribe to News RSS Feed

A Death Sentence for Want of a Lawyer

Posted in News, State Habeas Corpus

In today’s New York Times, former Chief Justice Norman Fletcher has written an editorial denouncing the upcoming execution of the Georgia inmate sentenced to death in 1990. Chief Justice Fletcher is particularly concerned about the fact that the inmate lost out on the possible federal review of this case. The inmate, while representing himself, missed… Continue Reading

Final Thoughts on JQC Amendment 3

Posted in News

I am not surprised that Amendment 3 passed. It was a bad idea with an unsavory political history. I did not personally know any lawyers who were in love with it. And my non-lawyer friends who asked me about it seemed persuaded that it was a bad idea. But, alas, I don’t know millions of… Continue Reading

Re-Examining Dick Donovan’s Rant

Posted in News

Over at Fault Lines, Andrew Fleischman has an article on Paulding DA Dick Donovan’s Facebook post. Jim Galloway at the Atlanta Journal noticed it, too. The post was a “eulogy for white Judeo-Christian men.” It was really quite jarring to read, particularly by a person who has extraordinary power to prosecute people and even seek… Continue Reading

A Radical Fundamentalist By Any Other Name is Still a Radical Fundamentalist

Posted in News

Since the Orlando Night Club shooting, Trump and others have criticized the President for not using the magic words “Radical Islam” in discussion of the news. According to NBC News: When Donald Trump blasted President Obama for failing to make reference to Islam in connection with the Orlando nightclub massacre, the GOP’s presumptive presidential nominee… Continue Reading

Roderick K. Bridges, God’s Choice for State Court

Posted in News

Under Article Six, Section Three of the United States Constitution, “no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.” The Religious Tests Clause made good sense when it was passed. The Framers had in mind various Test Acts that were a part of British… Continue Reading

Much Belated Thoughts on Changes to Georgia’s JQC

Posted in News

I meant to write a post on this topic at the end of the legislative session. Very late in the game, the Georgia General Assembly radically changed Georgia’s Judicial Qualifications Commission, the ethics watchdog agency for Georgia judges. Shortly after these changes were made, the head of the JQC very publicly resigned. I have mixed… Continue Reading

Removing the Stigma When You’ve Done Your Time

Posted in News, State Habeas Corpus

Last week, I was able to help a young man stay in the country rather than be deported to a land where he has few ties. The young man is officially a citizen of a foreign country. But he is practically an American, having grown up in Georgia and with all of his family here. Several months ago, he… Continue Reading

Yo Gotti: Making the Henry County Judiciary Famous

Posted in News

Rapper, YoGotti, recently released a video shot in a Henry County, Georgia, courtroom and throughout the courthouse. Henry County government officials are not amused. An official is on the record saying that the video, featuring a small claims lawsuit involving a hair weave that went up in flames, does not accurately represent “Henry County values.”… Continue Reading

The Conscription of Apple Engineers into Government Service

Posted in News, Opinions and Analysis

Before this week, I had never heard of the All Writs Act of 1789. As I understand from the news accounts I have read this week, a Federal Magistrate cites it as authority to order Apple to develop software that law enforcement can then use to break into an iPhone. For anyone who’s ever dealt… Continue Reading

The Future of Twitter

Posted in News

Over at Simple Justice, Scott Greenfield has a post about the future of Twitter (with a scatalogical title). In summary, the problem with Twitter and several other “tools” is that, while it has attracted many eyeballs, it is difficult to turn those eyeballs into money. I can’t speak to the broader economic trends. I can… Continue Reading

My Interview Regarding Gun Control

Posted in News

Yesterday, I was interviewed by Zosha Millman regarding the Constitutionality of Obama’s proposed executive actions on gun control. She did a great job of explaining the proposals as well as the potential permanence of them and their ultimate constitutionality. Take a look. I guarantee that it’s better than what’s currently in your Facebook feed from both… Continue Reading

Two New Justices on the Ga. Supreme Court? Why Would the Governor Make Such a Move?

Posted in News, Supreme Court of Georgia

Jim Galloway, in the Atlanta Journal’s Political Insider Blog, reports that the Governor is formulating a push in next year’s session of the legislature to increase Georgia’s seven-member Supreme Court by two justices. Mr. Galloway opines that the governor’s move could expand his influence beyond his eight year tenure and compares a potential Franklin Roosevelt’s… Continue Reading

Updates on Cases, Media, Editing

Posted in News, Uncategorized

Today, I had the honor to be interviewed by Celeste Headlee, the host of Georgia Public Broadcasting’s On Second Thought. We talked about the Georgia Supreme Court’s recent set of cases, both criminal and civil. Check out today’s show. Listen to the whole thing of skip to minute 30 for my segment on the cases…. Continue Reading

Vanity Fair Profile on Judy Clarke

Posted in News

Are you an attorney looking for inspiration? Are you a client who disagrees with your criminal defense lawyer’s tactics even though you see she’s working hard on your case? Run, don’t walk to pick up a copy of Vanity Fair, or read online Mark Bowden’s piece on death penalty defense lawyer Judy Clarke. It was… Continue Reading

Does the Jury Have the Right to Know About Mandatory Minimums?

Posted in News, Opinions and Analysis

Jarvis Taylor was on trial for committing an armed robbery with an air gun. Because his prior criminal history included theft by receiving stolen property, possession of a tool for the commission of a crime, and aggravated assault for his actions during a jail riot, a conviction for the armed robbery would have meant a… Continue Reading

Lawyer Who Let Client Write Brief Faces Sanctions from SCOTUS

Posted in Attorney-Client Relationship, News

I just read at Bitter Lawyer and The Lawyerist about a show cause order issued by the United States Supreme Court for the submission of a certiorari petition that was hard to read and which departed significantly from the Supreme Court rules. What happened? The lawyer allowed the client to draft the certiorari petition. I… Continue Reading