February 2016

I’m all for democracy, but election season is not fun for lawyers. This year, unlike any other, I  have been spammed by lawyers running for office:

  • whom I do not know and don’t think I’ve ever met;
  • In counties where I seldom practice; and
  • who delivered a prepared telemarketer-style speech when they get me on

Over at Simple Justice, Scott Greenfield has a post about the future of Twitter (with a scatalogical title). In summary, the problem with Twitter and several other “tools” is that, while it has attracted many eyeballs, it is difficult to turn those eyeballs into money.

I can’t speak to the broader economic trends.

I’ve obsessively read as much as I could find over the weekend about the upcoming confirmation battle to replace the late Justice Scalia. And there is much to read. Saturday’s news and what unfolds over the next weeks will be the subject of many books, if not movies, to come.

We’re away for the weekend. And I happened to look up and see the news on television at a restaurant. And it still does not quite seem real.

When I was a law student, Scalia opinions were the first ones I remember reading and enjoying. I won’t say that I agreed with them all. But

The podcasts I listen to cost me money. On a recent podcast, I caught an interview with Cal Newport, who discussed his new book, Deep Work. I’ve been taking a break from business books lately, but this one is very different. His thesis is simple. Our technology has created an expectation and a

Every now and then, I e-file things at the Supreme Court that require me to attach a set of exhibits. There are a few categories of things that require you to petition for the Court to take your appeal. And when you do that, you have to put together your own record into a sort