January 2017

I sometimes find myself having the same conversation with different colleagues several days in a row. It may be that my thoughts find their way into the conversation or that there are certain trends. It may be pure coincidence. In the most recent version of the repeating conversation phenomenon, I have heard colleagues complain about the nature of practice. And here is the three-fold refrain.

  • The market is flooded with attorneys where I practice. And I cannot provide the service that I want because I am getting beaten on price by attorneys who will not do the same good job I would do.
  • Every year the legislature/sentencing guidelines/judges/parole board/appellate courts (we could continue to fill in these blanks for a while) makes it harder for me to provide very much to clients.
  • Client are so difficult. They have unrealistic expectations, and they want to micro-manage their case.

I have a couple of thoughts about what I am hearing. And when I approach it this way, I tend to gain a new perspective.


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