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Tag Archives: Scott Greenfield

Storytelling: The Why and the How

Posted in Trial Techniques, Uncategorized, Writing

One of my favorite bloggers on trial advocacy is Mark Bennett. Mark has written a series of great posts at Simple Justice, Scott Greenfield’s blog on the topic of opening statements. Mark offers 11 rules for better opening statements. One tip is to limit your opening statement to fifteen minutes. From experience, this is a… Continue Reading

The Future of Twitter

Posted in News

Over at Simple Justice, Scott Greenfield has a post about the future of Twitter (with a scatalogical title). In summary, the problem with Twitter and several other “tools” is that, while it has attracted many eyeballs, it is difficult to turn those eyeballs into money. I can’t speak to the broader economic trends. I can… Continue Reading

The Importance of Lawyerly Agnosticism

Posted in Attorney-Client Relationship

Recently Scott Greenfield wrote about David Aylor’s rather noisy departure from accused murderer, Michael Slager’s case. So much went wrong and was analyzed in the post. But there’s one piece of it that I want to emphasize here. Mr. Greenfield writes: It’s hard to blame Aylor for being sucked in by Slager’s lie. Clients lie… Continue Reading

If Juries Could Impose the Sentence

Posted in Opinions and Analysis

In Georgia, juries generally don’t get to decide the sentence. Only where the State is seeking death does the jury get a hand in sentencing. Not only do Georgia juries not get a say in sentencing decisions, our law is designed not to let them know a great deal about what might happen at sentencing…. Continue Reading

To Be a Better Listener / To Ask for Advice Better

Posted in Attorney-Client Relationship, Writing

It’s been a long holiday season, and January’s been a busy time. I’m hoping to re-develop the blogging habit. And I find that I am much better at writing posts when I’m reading posts. Toward that end, I opened up the RSS app and caught back up on my favorite blogs, Simple Justice and Defending… Continue Reading

Georgia Appeals Court Rules “Mandate Ugliness”

Posted in Georgia Court of Appeals, Supreme Court of Georgia, Writing

In his blog yesterday, Kendall Gray referenced the Rules of the Georgia Court of Appeals, citing it as “a jurisdiction with rule-mandated ugliness.” Kendall’s blog post comes at a time when I am reading Typography for Lawyers by William Butterick. I’ve learned a great deal about fonts and layout and was all excited about using… Continue Reading

How Your Brief Looks is Nearly as Important as What You Say

Posted in Writing

Design is an important part of brief writing. And the font and layout you choose will have an impact on how the Court receives your brief. It certainly shapes how I feel about writing the brief and submitting it. I cannot see the Courier New Font without thinking of the research, writing, and advocacy in… Continue Reading

Some Thoughts on Relating to Clients in Georgia Criminal Cases

Posted in Attorney-Client Relationship

It’s been a long week. I’ve had to have “the talk” with several of my clients. In case you don’t know what I mean by “the talk,” allow me to explain. There comes a point in just about every attorney-client relationship where there is an important decision to be made. You give your assessment, and… Continue Reading

It Isn’t Done Until You Have Communicated in Georgia Appeals and Habeas Cases

Posted in Attorney-Client Relationship

Scott Greenfield wrote a good story a few days ago in his blog, Simple Justice. I say “good” in the sense that it made me evaluate the part of practicing law where it can be easiest to drop the ball.  In the post, he tells the story of a call he received from the relative… Continue Reading